Markus Grebe and Stefano PietraDuring the first European "Fascination of Plants Day" 2012 that occured at 18th of May, UPSC researcher Markus Grebe was interviewed by the journal of Cell biology.
Markus Grebe studies the establishment and maintenance of cell and tissue polarity in plants

The full interview can be read here
More information on Grebes research
Swedish Fascination of Plants Day website

Bolting beets in a field of cultivated beets can seriously impair overall yield: Picture: Pierre Pin Copyright: Umeå Plant Science CentreBolting beets in a field of cultivated beets can seriously impair overall yield. Picture: Pierre Pin. Copyright: Umeå Plant Science CentreGerman and Swedish research groups at Kiel University and Umeå Plant Science Centre have identified the long-sought bolting gene B in the sugar beet crop. The gene called BvBTC1 determines if and when a beet plant will flower. Early flowering has the undesired effect of terminating the root growth of the beet which can limit the sugar beet yields worldwide. The new findings allow seed producers to improve cultivation efficiency by minimising yield reducing seed contamination's and help breeders to develop novel cultivars with larger beets. These results from more than five years of intensive cooperation with the industrial research partners Syngenta, Strube, SESVanderHave and KWS were published online [this week] in the journal Current Biology.
FVD logo LEVälkommen till Fascinerande växters dag
18 maj, kl.14-18 Öppet hus på KBC och HUMlab!
Open House on May 18, 14-18 at KBC and HUMlab!

Scientists from Umeå Plant Science Centre, Departments of Ecology and Environmental Science and Chemistry invite you to an exciting day with experiments and tours through laboratories and on campus. Visit HUMlab and test some digital platforms which have plants as a theme.

pdfFlyer (in Swedish)
Web page European Fascination of Plants Day (www.plantday12.eu)
Web page Fascinerande växters dag (www.fascinerandevaxtersdag.se)
20120412 Visit of Jean-Pierre Lacroix french ambassador lrThe French ambassador in Sweden, Jean-Pierre Lacroix, visited UPSC on the 12th of april, to discuss with French UPSC scientists, scholars and students of Umeå University after meetings with Birgitta Heijer, governor of the Västerbotten region, as well as other representatives from Umeå University, the municipality of Umeå and the organizing committee of UMEÅ2014 European capital of culture.

Read more at the French Embassy homepage

1670385 520 292Professor Stefan Jansson at UPSC is discussing the use of Gene modified crops and the recent Swedish development of a barley variant that assimilates nitrogen more efficiently compared to wild type in a radio program at Swedish Radio (SR).

Listen online (in Swedish)
Read press release (in Swedish)
94480 maria-ahnlund 11020564c02cThe Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, the largest private financier of research in Sweden, announced their decision on funding of infrastructures in Sweden. In total the foundation assigned 353 million SEK of which 220 million SEK will fund infrastructures within life sciences and medicine. A major part will go to KBC and its technical platforms for Metabolomics and NMR.

Metabolomics platform at UPSC
NMR platform at KBC
Press release from the Knut and Alice Wallenbergs Foundadtion (in Swedish)
Press release from Umeå University (in Swedish)

93445 vintertrad webbOn April 4-5th the Swedish television channel “Kunskapskanalen” (Knowledge Channel) is broadcasting lectures on the subject “The forest of possibilities”. Researchers from UPSC participates in these lectures.

Read more (in Swedish)
See online (in Swedish)
92969 gmoUPSC researcher Stefan Jansson has taken the initiative for a GMO symposium at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. The symposium was sent online Mars 20, 2012.

Read more (in Swedish)
See symposium online (in Swedish)
field41 researchers, 90% of those funded by the Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet) for basic research on plants – published on 1 October 2011 a debate article in Dagens Nyheter.

The scientists argue that it is absolutely necessary that the use of genetically modified plants is regulated in the same manner as the use of conventionally bred plants, both in scientific experiments and agricultural and forest management. The present legislation is obsolete and does not consider modern knowledge on genetic engineering and genetic variation.

The scientists also refute common prejudices, normally brought up by environmental activists to mobilize against breeding and cultivation of genetically modified plants. The plant scientists insist that a reform of the regulation and treatment of genetically modified crops is essential to meet food and energy needs of a growing world population with limited energy resources.

20 of the 41 scientists work at UPSC.
Researchers at UPSC are part of a research program on artificial photosynthesis that was recently granted by 'Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelser' with more than 40Mkr for 5 years. The idea is to try to understand exactly how plants absorb and use light energy and with this knowledge as a template create an artificial system that can harvest light and produce energy in a useful form for mankind, for example hydrogen, or other high energy compounds.