The research at the centre concentrates on the basic biology and chemistry underlying important traits in forest tree development and use.All research conducted is organized into the three task forces with their particular research focus. All currently 35 research groups working within the centre are assigned to their respective task force.


  1. Bakó, Lazlo - Control of Plant Cell Division and Differentiation
  2. Bellini, Catherine - Control of Adventitious Root Initiation and Phloem Function
  3. Bhalerao, Rishikesh P - Seasonal Control of Growth in Perennial Plants and Regulation of Cell Elongation
  4. Egertsdotter, Ulrika - Somatic Embryogenesis (SE) in Conifers
  5. Eriksson, Maria E - Circadian Clock Function and its Importance for the Regulation of Growth
  6. Ganeteg, Ulrika - Molecular Physiology of Plant Nitrogen Nutrition
  7. García-Gil, María Rosario - Forest Tree Genetics and Breeding
  8. Hurry, Vaughan - Plant Adaptation to Sub-Optimal Environments
  9. Hvidsten, Torgeir R - Systems Biology Analysis of Regulatory Networks in Plants
  10. Ingvarsson, Pär - The Genetic Basis of Ecologically Important Traits
  11. Jansson, Stefan - Light, Senescence and Natural Variation
  12. Ljung, Karin - Root Development and Shoot-Root Communication
  13. Mellerowicz, Ewa - Wood Matrix Polysaccharides: Biosynthesis and Modification
  14. Moritz, Thomas - Hormonal Control of Shoot Elongation and Wood Formation
  15. Niittylä, Totte - Carbohydrate Metabolism and Cell Wall Biosynthesis
  16. Nilsson, Ove - Control of Flowering Time and Meristem Identity
  17. Nordin, Annika - Ecophysiological Forest Management
  18. Näsholm, Torgny - Ecophysiology and Molecular Biology of Plant Organic N Nutrition
  19. Strand, Åsa - Organelle-to-Nucleus Signalling Pathways
  20. Sundberg, Björn - Wood Formation
  21. Trygg, Johan - Combined Profiling in Poplar using a Systems Biology Approach
  22. Tuominen, Hannele - Xylem Maturation and Wood Properties
  23. Wingsle, Gunnar - Regulatory Proteins in the Lignocellulosic pathway in Wood studied by Proteomics